ARISTOTLE QUOTES

Greek philosopher (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

Aristotle quote

With the truth, all given facts harmonize; but with what is false, the truth soon hits a wrong note.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Tags: truth


To become an able man in any profession, there are three things necessary -- nature, study, and practice.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Day's Collacon

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Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

7 likes

Tags: poverty


Wit is well-bred insolence.

ARISTOTLE, Rhetoric

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Tags: wit


Law is order, and good law is good order.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: order


If things do not turn out as we wish, we should wish for them as they turn out.

ARISTOTLE, Metaphysics

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Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in the consciousness that we deserve them.

ARISTOTLE, attributed, Best Thoughts of Best Thinkers

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If you string together a set of speeches expressive of character, and well finished in point and diction and thought, you will not produce the essential tragic effect nearly so well as with a play which, however deficient in these respects, yet has a plot and artistically constructed incidents.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

4 likes

Tags: playwriting


Where perception is, there also are pain and pleasure, and where these are, there, of necessity, is desire.

ARISTOTLE, Physica

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The brave man, if he be compared with the coward, seems foolhardy; and, if with the foolhardy man, seems a coward.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Where the interests of truth are at actual stake, we ought, perhaps, to sacrifice even that which is our own--if, at least, we are to lay any claim to a philosophic spirit.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

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Tags: truth


If women are by barbarians reduced to the level of slaves, it is because barbarians themselves have never yet risen to the rank of men.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: women


Dramatic action, therefore, is not with a view to the representation of character: character comes in as subsidiary to the actions.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

3 likes


One can aim at honor both as one ought, and more than one ought, and less than one ought. He whose craving for honor is excessive is said to be ambitious, and he who is deficient in this respect unambitious; while he who observes the mean has no peculiar name.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

3 likes

Tags: honor


Nature does nothing uselessly.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

3 likes

Tags: nature


For the purposes of poetry a convincing impossibility is preferable to an unconvincing possibility.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

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The equalization of fortunes may have some slight tendency to stifle animosity and to prevent dissension. But its effect is always inconsiderable, and often doubtful; since those who think themselves entitled to superiority will not patiently brook equality.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

3 likes

Tags: equality


We become just by performing just actions, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave actions.

ARISTOTLE, Nicomachean Ethics

2 likes

Tags: action


As for the story, whether the poet takes it ready made or constructs it for himself, he should first sketch its general outline, and then fill in the episodes and amplify in detail.

ARISTOTLE, Poetics

2 likes

Tags: writing


Neglect of an effective birth control policy is a never-failing source of poverty which, in turn, is the parent of revolution and crime.

ARISTOTLE, Politics

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Tags: birth control