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EMILY BRONTE QUOTES

Any relic of the dead is precious.

A person who has not done one half his day's work by ten o'clock, runs a chance of leaving the other half undone.

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Vain are the thousand creeds
That move men's hearts: unutterably vain;
Worthless as withered weeds,
Or idlest froth amid the boundless main.

EMILY BRONTE, Last Lines

I am now quite cured of seeking pleasure in society, be it country or town. A sensible man ought to find sufficient company in himself.

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Honest people don't hide their deeds.

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Any relic of the dead is precious, if they were valued living.

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Though earth and man were gone,
And suns and universes ceased to be,
And Thou wert left alone,
Every existence would exist in Thee.

EMILY BRONTE, Last Lines

Let grief distract the sufferer's breast,
And night obscure his way;
They hasten him to endless rest,
And everlasting day.

EMILY BRONTE, A Day Dream

The tyrant grinds down his slaves and they don’t turn against him, they crush those beneath them.

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Hope, whose whisper would have given
Balm to all my frenzied pain,
Stretched her wings, and soared to heaven,
Went, and ne'er returned again!

EMILY BRONTE, Hope

Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves.

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Love is like the wild rose-briar;
Friendship like the holly-tree.
The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms,
But which will bloom most constantly?

Emily Brontë, Love and Friendship

The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always -- take any form -- drive me mad! Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!

EMILY BRONTE, Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë quote

Look on the grave where thou must sleep
Thy last, and strongest foe;
It is endurance not to weep,
If that repose seem woe.

EMILY BRONTE, Self-Interrogation

I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

EMILY BRONTË, Wuthering Heights

'Twas grief enough to think mankind
All hollow servile insincere
But worse to trust to my own mind
And find the same corruption there.

EMILY BRONTË, "I Am the Only Being"

Shall Earth no more inspire thee,
Thou lonely dreamer now?
Since passion may not fire thee
Shall Nature cease to bow?
Thy mind is ever moving
In regions dark to thee;
Recall its useless roving —
Come back and dwell with me.

EMILY BRONTË, "Shall Earth No More Inspire Thee"

He's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.

EMILY BRONTË, Wuthering Heights

Treachory and violence are spears pointed at both ends — they wound those who resort to them worse than their enemies.

EMILY BRONTË, Wuthering Heights

I am the only being whose doom
No tongue would ask no eye would mourn
I never caused a thought of gloom
A smile of joy since I was born
In secret pleasure — secret tears
This changeful life has slipped away
As friendless after eighteen years
As lone as on my natal day.

EMILY BRONTË, "I Am the Only Being"

I have no pity! The more the worms writhe, the more I yearn to crush out their entrails! It is a moral teething; and I grind with greater energy in proportion to the increase of pain.

EMILY BRONTË, Wuthering Heights

There is not room for Death,
Nor atom that his might could render void:
Thou — Thou art Being and Breath,
And what Thou art may never be destroyed.

EMILY BRONTË, Last Lines

I wish I were a girl again, half-savage and hardy, and free.

EMILY BRONTË, Wuthering Heights

I'm wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there; not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart; but really with it, and in it.

EMILY BRONTË, Wuthering Heights

O, dreadful is the check — intense the agony
When the ear begins to hear and the eye begins to see;
When the pulse begins to throb, the brain to think again,
The soul to feel the flesh and the flesh to feel the chain.

EMILY BRONTË, "The Prisoner"

Browse Emily Brontë Quotes II

Emily Brontë - an essay by John Cowper Powys

Emily Bronte Monologues - a collection of monologues from her writings.

Emily Bronte Poems - a collection of her poetry.

Emily Bronte Bibliography - a bibliography, including list of critical resources.


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