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WELLINS CALCOTT QUOTES

An honest man lives not to the world, but to himself.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

In the book of Nature, the Divine Teacher speaks.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

The nearest way to Honour is for a man so to live that he may be found to be that in truth he would be thought to be.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Affliction is a spiritual physic for the soul, and is compared to a furnace, for as gold is tried and purified therein, so men are proved and either purified from their dross, and fitted for good uses, or else entirely burnt up and undone forever.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Anger may repast with you for an hour, but not repose with you for a night. The continuance of Anger, is hatred; the continuance of hatred becomes malice; that Anger is not warrantable that has suffered the sun to set on it.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Nothing contributes more to make men polite and civilized, than true and genuine Charity.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Luxury is artificial poverty; and no man has so much care as he who endeavours after the most riches.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

There is no duty in religion more generally agreed on, nor more justly required by God almighty, than a perfect submission to his will in all things: Nor is there any disposition of mind that can either please him more or become us better, than that of being satisfied with all he gives, and contented with all he takes away; none, I am sure, can be of more honour to God, nor more easy to ourselves; for if we consider him as our maker we cannot contend with him; if as our father we ought not to distrust him; so that we may be confident, whatever he does is intended for our good; and whatever happens that we may interpret otherwise, yet we cannot get nothing by repining, nor save anything by resisting.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Storms in the Conscience will always lodge clouds in the countenance.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Let a man live but two or three years without Affliction, and he is almost good for nothing.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

The utmost we can hope for in this world is Contentment; if we aim at anything higher, we shall meet with nothing but grief and disappointment.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

We bring into the world a poor, needy, uncertain life, short at the best; all the imaginations of the wise have been busied to find out the ways how to revive it with pleasure, or relieve it with counsel; how to compose it with ease, and settle it with safety; to some of these ends have been employed the instructions of Lawgivers, the reasonings of Philosophers, the inventions of Poets, the pains of labouring, and the extravagancies of the Voluptuous; all the world is at work perpetually about nothing else, but only that our poor mortal lives should pass the easier and the happier that little time we possess them; or else end the better when we lose them.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Anger glances in the breasts of wise men; but rests in the bosom of fools.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

For no man lives, who always happy is.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

It is the business of a man, either to prevent an evil that threatens him, or, when it is come, to qualify and alleviate its malignity; or put on a masculine brave spirit, and to resolve to endure it.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Anger comes sometimes upon us, but we go oftener to it, and, instead of rejecting it, we invite it: Yet it is a vice that carries with it neither pleasure nor profit, neither honour nor security.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

It is the duty of every individual, to be a friend to mankind, as it is his interest, that men should be friendly to him.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Charity no sooner begins to take root in the heart, but it makes all those weaknesses vanish at once. It softens what is hard and rough; it cures that presumption and haughtiness that pretends to decide and judge of every thing; it instructs us how to doubt, and how to reflect; to be teachable and not to rely too much on our own wisdom and understanding. It destroys all manner of positiveness, and moderates the very tone of our voice; and in such persons, as are already polite and endowed with the qualities that render people lovely to the rest of mankind, it gives this charming outside a motive and an inward principle far different from self-love.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Conscience therefore is a high and awful power; it is solo Deo minor, next and immediately under God, our judge.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

There is a set of imperious and arrogant people, with whom it is dangerous to engage, that always arrogate reason and sense to themselves, and allow no one else to be in the right.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

What does thou ail, O mortal man, or to what purpose is to spend thy life in groans and complaints, under the apprehensions of Death? Where are thy past years and pleasures? Are they not vanish'd and lost in the flux of time, as if thou hadst put water into a sieve? Bethink thyself then of retreat, and leave the world with the same content and satisfaction as a well satisfied guest rises from an agreeable feast.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Covetousness is an eager desire of getting and keeping the goods of this life in a manner that is contrary to the command of God, and inconsistent with the welfare of men. It consists in an habitual tendency or lust of the soul, whereby it is carried out and inclined towards the enjoyment of worldly riches, as its highest and chiefest good.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

As it is the chief concern of wise men, to retrench the evils of life, by reasonings of philosophy; so it is the employment of fools, to multiply them, by sentiments of superstition.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Cowardice ... is a timorous dejection of soul, creating imaginary dangers. When such a faint-hearted wretch as this is at sea, he fancies all the promontories are so many hulks of ships wreck'd on the coast. The least agitation of the waters puts him in a panic fear, and makes him enquire whether all that are aboard ar initiated.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

Chastity consists in a fix'd abhorrence of all forbidden sensual indulgences, a recollection of past impurities with shame and sorrow; a resolute guard over our thoughts, passions, and actions for the future; a steady abstinence from the distant approaches of lust and indecency; and a lively consciousness of the omnipresence of the Almighty, who is of purer eyes than to behold iniquity.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine

The eternal God, in whom we live, and move, and have our being, has impressed upon us all one nature, which as an emanation from him, who is universal life, presses us by natural society to a close union with each other; which is, methinks, a sort of enlargement of our very selves when we run into the idea, sensations and concerns of our brethren: by this force of their make, men are insensibly hurried into each other; and, by a secret charm, we lament with the unfortunate, and rejoice with the glad; for it is not possible for an human heart to be averse to any thing that is human: but, by the very mien and gesture of the joyful and distressed, we rise and fall into their condition; and since joy is communicative, 'tis reasonable that grief should be contagious, both which are seen and felt at a look, for one man's eyes are spectacles to another to read his heart: those useful and honest instruments do not only discover objects to us, but make ourselves also transparent; for they, in spite of dissimulation, when the Heart is full, will brighten into gladness, or gush into tears: from this foundation in nature is kindled that noble spark of celestial fire, we call charity or Compassion, which opens our bosoms and extends our arms to embrace all mankind.

WELLINS CALCOTT, Thoughts Moral and Divine


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