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DAVID HUME QUOTES

What we call a mind is nothing but a heap or collection of different perceptions, united together by certain relations and supposed, though falsely, to be endowed with a perfect simplicity and identity.

DAVID HUME, A Treatise of Human Nature

If suicide be supposed a crime, 'tis only cowardice can impel us to it. If it be no crime, both prudence and courage should engage us to rid ourselves at once of existence, when it becomes a burden.

DAVID HUME, Essays on Suicide and the Immortality of the Soul

When suicide is out of fashion we conclude that none but madmen destroy themselves; and all the efforts of courage appear chimerical to dastardly minds ... Nevertheless, how many instances are there, well attested, of men, in every other respect perfectly discreet, who, without remorse, rage, or despair, have quitted life for no other reason than because it was a burden to them, and have died with more composure than they lived?

DAVID HUME, Essays on Suicide and the Immortality of the Soul

Where ambition can be so happy as to cover its enterprizes, even to the person himself, under the appearance of principle, it is the most incurable and inflexible of all human passions.

DAVID HUME, The History of England

A wise man ... proportions his belief to the evidence.

DAVID HUME, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

The best taxes are such as are levied upon consumptions, especially those of luxury; because such taxes are least felt by the people. They seem, in some measure, voluntary; since a man may choose how far he will use the commodity: They naturally produce sobriety and frugality, if judiciously imposed: And being confounded with the natural price of the commodity, they are scarcely perceived by the consumers. Their only disadvantage is that they are expensive in the levying.

DAVID HUME, Essays

Anticipation of pleasure is, in itself, a very considerable pleasure.

DAVID HUME, A Treatise of Human Nature

Such a superiority do the pursuits of literature possess above every other occupation, that even he who attains but a mediocrity in them, merits the pre-eminence above those that excel the most in the common and vulgar professions.

DAVID HUME, The History of England

Vanity is so closely allied to virtue, and to love the fame of laudable actions for their own sake, that these passions are more capable of mixture than any other kinds of affection; and it is almost impossible to have the latter without some degree of the former.

DAVID HUME, Essays Moral, Political, and Literary

Could ... dogmatical reasoners become sensible of the strange infirmities of human understanding, even in its most perfect state, and when most accurate and cautious in its determinations; such a reflection would naturally inspire them with more modesty and reserve, and diminish their fond opinion of themselves, and their prejudice against antagonists.

DAVID HUME, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding

Nothing appears more surprising to those, who consider human affairs with a philosophical eye, than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few; and the implicit submission, with which men resign their own sentiments and passions to those of their rulers.

DAVID HUME, "Of the First Principles of Government", Essays Literary, Moral and Political

The most pernicious of all taxes are the arbitrary.

DAVID HUME, Essays


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