HENRY PARRY LIDDON QUOTES

English theologian (1829-1890)

Henry Parry Liddon quote

Nothing is really lost by a life of sacrifice: everything is lost by failure to obey God's call.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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A few years hence and he will be beneath the sod; but those cliffs will stand, as now, facing the ocean, incessantly lashed by its waves, yet unshaken, immovable; and other eyes will gaze on them for their brief day of life, and then they, too, will close.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Practically speaking, there are for each one of us two supreme realities -- God and the soul. The heavens and the earth will pass away. But the soul will still remain, face to face with God.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Let us think today of the prospect of sharing in a sublime and blessed existence such as is portrayed in the text of the Apocalypse before us, and let us ask ourselves whether it should or should not make any difference in our present state of being.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Look to the end; and resolve to make the service of Christ the first object in what remains of life, without indifference to the opinion of your fellow men, but also without fear of it.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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The real difficulty with thousands in the present day is not that Christianity has been found wanting, but that it has never been seriously tried.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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If man looks within himself he must perceive two things: a law of right, and that which it condemns.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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It is some disaster for any mind to hold any one thing for truth that is untrue, however insignificant it be, or however honestly it be held. It is a greater disaster when the false prejudice bars the way to some truth behind it, which, but for it, would find an entrance to the soul; and the greatness of the disaster will in this case be measured by the importance of the excluded truth.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Truth has her sterner responsibilities sooner or later in store for those who have known anything about her.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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When the fields of human knowledge are so various and so vast as is the case in our day, the utmost that can be done by single minds not of encyclopedic range, is to master one subject or branch of subject as thoroughly as possible, and to rest content with knowing that others are working in regions where neither time nor strength will permit us to enter.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Poverty ... is already half-Christian by its very nature; it has everything to gain by a doctrine which makes so little of the present and the visible, and so much of the future and the unseen.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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The great laws of the moral world do not vary, however different, under different dispensations, may be the authoritative enunciation of truth, or the means of propagating and defending it.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Certainly, envy is no monopoly of the poor; it makes itself felt in all sections of society; it haunts the court, the library, the barrack-room, even the sanctuary; it is provoked in some unhappy souls by the near neighbourhood of any superior rank or excellence whatever.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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The Church of the Apostles was a Church of the poor; of silver and gold it had none.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Useful knowledge, practical kindness, and beneficent laws -- these are not the Gospel; but, like philosophy, they are, or may be, its handmaids. They may make its task smooth and grateful; they may associate themselves with its victories, or they may prepare its way.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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If we look to the historical influences which have actually enacted human codes, and which have governed their administration, it is at first difficult to understand the sanctity which is thus attributed to the law and its ministers. And if, further, we examine the contents of human codes, and observe how far short they fall of enforcing, even within the limits that must bound all attempts at such enforcement, anything like an absolute morality, this difficulty is not diminished. Between law and equity there is, perhaps there must always be, a considerable interval. Between law and absolute morality there is at times patent contradiction. The undue protection of class interests, the neglect of interests of large classes; the legislation which consults, chiefly and above all else, the profit of the legislator, whether he be king, or noble, or popular assembly; the legislation which postpones moral to material interests, and which makes havoc of man's highest good in order to gratify his lower instincts, his passing caprice, his unreasoning passion -- all this and much else appears to forbid enthusiasm for human law.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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What we do upon a great occasion will probably depend upon what we already are; what we are will be the result of previous years of self-discipline.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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Prayer is the act by which man, detaching himself from the embarrassments of sense and nature, ascends to the true level of his destiny.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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So long as men die, life will reassert its tragic interest from time to time with fresh energy, and to this interest Christianity alone can respond. If the scientific people could rid us of death, they might indeed hope to win over the heart and conscience of the world, permanently, to some form of non-theistic speculation. As it is, the tide ebbs, as I believe, only that it may flow again.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, letter to C. T. Redington, June 27, 1877

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As all true virtue, wherever found, is a ray of the life of the All-Holy; so all solid knowledge, all really accurate thought, descends from the Eternal Reason, and ought, when we apprehend it, to guide us upwards to Him.

HENRY PARRY LIDDON, Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford

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