CHARLES LINDBERGH QUOTES

American aviator, author, & inventor (1902-1974)

Charles Lindbergh quote

Is he alone who has courage on his right hand and faith on his left hand?

CHARLES LINDBERGH, attributed, 1927

2 likes

Tags: faith


The forces of Hannibal, Drake and Napoleon moved at best with the horses' gallop or the speed of wind on sail. Now, aviation brings a new concept of time and distance to the affairs of men. It demands adaptability to change, places a premium on quickness of thought and speed of action.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, "Aviation, Geography, and Race", Reader's Digest, November 1939

2 likes

Tags: aviation


In wilderness I sense the miracle of life, and behind it our scientific accomplishments fade to trivia.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, "The Wisdom of Wilderness", Life Magazine, December 22, 1967

2 likes

Tags: nature


It was a love of the air and sky and flying, the lure of adventure, the appreciation of beauty. It lay beyond the descriptive words of men -- where immortality is touched through danger, where life meets death on equal plane; where man is more than man, and existence both supreme and valueless at the same time.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, thoughts after his first parachute jump, The Spirit of St. Louis

2 likes


If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, "Is Civilization Progress?", Reader's Digest, July 1964

1 likes

Tags: birds


Sometimes, flying feels too godlike to be attained by man. Sometimes, the world from above seems too beautiful, too wonderful, too distant for human eyes to see.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Spirit of St. Louis

1 likes

Tags: aviation


When environment changes, there must be a corresponding change in life.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Wartime Journals

1 likes

Tags: environment


By day, or on a cloudless night, a pilot may drink the wine of the gods, but it has an earthly taste; he's a god of the earth, like one of the Grecian deities who lives on worldly mountains and descended for intercourse with men. But at night, over a stratus layer, all sense of the planet may disappear. You know that down below, beneath that heavenly blanket is the earth, factual and hard. But it's an intellectual knowledge; it's a knowledge tucked away in the mind; not a feeling that penetrates the body. And if at times you renounce experience and mind's heavy logic, it seems that the world has rushed along on its orbit, leaving you alone flying above a forgotten cloud bank, somewhere in the solitude of interstellar space.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Spirit of St. Louis

1 likes


I began to feel that I lived on a higher plane than the skeptics of the ground; one that was richer because of its very association with the element of danger they dreaded, because it was freer of the earth to which they were bound. In flying, I tasted a wine of the gods of which they could know nothing. Who valued life more highly, the aviators who spent it on the art they loved, or these misers who doled it out like pennies through their antlike days? I decided that if I could fly for ten years before I was killed in a crash, it would be a worthwhile trade for an ordinary life time.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Spirit of St. Louis

1 likes


I live only in the moment in this strange unmortal space, crowded with beauty, pierced with danger.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Spirit of St. Louis

1 likes

Tags: danger


There's one thing I wish to get straight about this flight. They call me "Lucky," but luck isn't enough. As a matter of fact, I had what I regarded and still regard as the best existing plane to make the flight from New York to Paris. I had what I regard as the best engine, and I was equipped with what were in the circumstances the best possible instruments for making such efforts. I hope I made good use of what I had.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, interview with New York Times correspondent in Paris shortly after completing the first solo trans-Atlantic flight, May 22, 1927

1 likes

Tags: luck


I saw a fleet of fishing boats.... I flew down almost touching the craft and yelled at them, asking if I was on the right road to Ireland. They just stared. Maybe they didn't hear me. Maybe I didn't hear them. Or maybe they thought I was just a crazy fool. An hour later I saw land.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, New York Times, May 23, 1927

1 likes


I was astonished at the effect my successful landing in France had on the nations of the world. To me, it was like a match lighting a bonfire.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, attributed, Little Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

1 likes


My aging body transmits an ageless life stream. Molecular and atomic replacement change life's composition. Molecules take part in structure and in training, countless trillions of them. After my death, the molecules of my being will return to the earth and sky. They came from the stars. I am of the stars.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, Autobiography of Values

1 likes


Here was a place where men and life and death had reached the lowest form of degradation. How could any reward in national progress even faintly justify the establishment and operation of such a place?

CHARLES LINDBERGH, after visiting a German concentration camp, attributed in The New York Times, April 20, 1980

1 likes

Tags: Holocaust


I have seen the science I worshiped, and the aircraft I loved, destroying the civilization I expected them to serve.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, Of Flight and Life

0 likes

Tags: war


Peace is a virgin who dare not show her face without Strength, her father, for protection.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, "Aviation, Geography, and Race", Reader's Digest, November 1939

0 likes

Tags: peace


I appreciated the reception which had been prepared for me, and had intended taxiing up to the front of the hangars, but no sooner had my plane touched the ground than a human sea swept toward it. I saw there was a danger of killing people with my propeller, and I quickly came to a stop. That reception was the most dangerous part of the trip. Never in my life have I seen anything like that human sea. It isn't clear to me yet just what happened. Before I knew it I had been hoisted out of the cockpit, and one moment was on the shoulders of some men and the next moment on the ground.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, interview with New York Times correspondent in Paris shortly after completing the first solo trans-Atlantic flight, May 22, 1927

0 likes


On a long flight, after periods of crisis and many hours of fatigue, mind and body may become disunited until at times they seem completely different elements, as though the body were only a home with which the mind has been associated but by no means bound. Consciousness grows independent of the ordinary senses.... The importance of physical desire and immediate surroundings is submerged in the apprehension of universal values.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, The Spirit of St. Louis

0 likes


I believe that for permanent survival, man must balance science with other qualities of life, qualities of body and spirit as well as those of mind -- qualities he cannot develop when he lets mechanics and luxury insulate him too greatly from the earth to which he was born.

CHARLES LINDBERGH, speech at the Annual Wright Dinner at the Aero Club of Washington, 1949

0 likes

Tags: science