ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH QUOTES

Irish Australian author & journalist (1861-1934)

Those who have suffered, who have known poverty or oppression, are generally the most prone to kindness. Perhaps it is well to endure some misery if only to learn this lesson.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Optimism will grow like a flower if the soil be properly prepared.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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The future seems a little gloomy! Go to bed early, sleep well, eat moderately at breakfast; the future looks brighter. The world's outlook may not have changed, but our capacity for dealing with it has. Happiness, or unhappiness, depends to some extent on external conditions, but also, and in most cases chiefly, on our own physical and mental powers. Some people would be discontented in Paradise, others ... are cheerful in a graveyard.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Pessimism is a product of our civilization. It is not natural to the savage; he feels pain, or discomfort, and suffers from these palpable conditions, but when he recovers from wounds he forgets the torments, and when he is well fed he is joyous in the light of day.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Pessimism is carefully cultivated in some intellectual circles, as if it were a precious plant that the human race could not afford to lose.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Vanity is apt to inspire contempt, but that becomes immediately tempered by a gentler and more gracious feeling; for the vain man desires to win our approbation, and in this way he flatters us.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Vanity is easily forgiven, for we are all vain, and even as we laugh at the weakness of others we feel that their vanity has touched the responding chord of our own.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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True love survives all shocks: an affection originally produced by admiration for unusual beauty may not only survive the loss of that beauty, but may become more intense if the beauty has changed into ugliness through causes that bind the lovers together in tender associations.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Jealousy is one of the wickedest of all the passions. It is that which has been the most fruitful mother of tragedies, murders, and wars. But reprehensible though it is, jealousy is almost rather to be pitied than blamed--its first victims are those who harbour the feeling.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Jealousy, in spite of the mad frenzy of its most splendid displays, is a vice of weakness; it arises from a mind whose aspirations and desires are inferior to its accomplishments; it is the child of baulked vanity and failure of courage.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Life is magical. There is something wonderful in being alive, in having within one's self all sorts of possibilities.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Life asks for a preparation as complete as we can afford; the great contest should be fought with spirit but with good temper always; we should never think the game lost while it is still going; and finally we should have the satisfaction of quitting the field able to say: I did my best.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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If a man has directed his course to great ends there is compensation even in ruin.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Truth is the one thing in nature always consistent with itself, and it is the one guide given to us in steering on the ocean of fate.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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We are heirs of the ages because throughout the ages mankind has devised and fashioned new things, and step by step added new conquests to our domain in that incessant contest with nature which means life. But we are decadent heirs if we cannot use the instruments that the ages have put into our hands. The acquisition of these, in the largest scope, is education.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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The accumulation of facts, even if interesting in themselves, should not constitute the main part of education; these facts, whether they be of classical learning or knick-knacks of history, will be of little use unless the mind has been trained to see them in proper perspective.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Children should not be coddled in their intellectual training any more than in their physical; and though the studies should be made interesting the interest should arise out of the studies themselves. We have bred a generation that cannot digest anything intellectual but tablets of peptonized food. One sees that in the popular papers with their brevity, still increasing in brevity as far as brevity can increase, and in the capacity for thought of our rulers.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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We must rejoice when love is great, and pardon its excess, for love is the staff of life, and life without love is life in vain.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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The test of education, apart from the accomplishments that secure places in an artificial system, should be this: Let the man be thrown naked on an unknown shore, and be forced to win his way amidst a new people. It may then be of little use to play cricket or to mishandle Tschaikowsky on a piano, but good physique, intelligence, and will power make their way infallibly.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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Tact is not a small thing; in the battle of life it is more powerful than a bludgeon.

ARTHUR ALFRED LYNCH, Moods of Life

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