ANGER QUOTES VI

quotations about anger

Anger is certainly a kind of baseness; as it appears well in the weakness of those subjects in whom it reigns; children, women, old folks, sick folks. Only men must beware, that they carry their anger rather with scorn, than with fear; so that they may seem rather to be above the injury, than below it; which is a thing easily done, if a man will give law to himself in it.

FRANCIS BACON, "Of Anger"

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Anger is sometimes unavoidable, as when we witness or hear of some outrageous act of injustice or cruelty. But if we must have it, let it be quick and soon over. For when it remains in us it is we who suffer, and not our adversary. It unnerves our hand, blinds our vision, impairs our judgment, and when it leaps to vengeance invariably overleaps, bringing to us regret and remorse in lieu of satisfaction.

FRANK CRANE, "Anger Poison"

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When anger rushes unrestrained to action, like a hot steed, it stumbles on its way; the man of thought strikes deepest and strikes safely.

R. SAVAGE, attributed, Day's Collacon

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Anger is uneasiness or discomposure of the mind upon the receipt of any injury, with a present purpose of revenge.

JOHN LOCKE, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

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If anger is not restrained, it is frequently more hurtful to us than the injury that provokes it.

SENECA, attributed, Day's Collacon

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Before you speak, my friend, remember, a spiritual man contain his anger. Angry words are like slap in de face.

CHRIS ABANI, Graceland

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The wrath that on conviction subsides into mildness, is the wrath of a generous mind.

JOHANN KASPAR LAVATER, Aphorisms on Man

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Anger is nature's way of discouraging people from d**king us around.

RORY SUTHERLAND, "Google's driverless car has finally crashed. Might humans be safer?", The Spectator, March 12, 2016

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We often fixate on how negative anger can be--how it can take hold of us, how it can hurt others and ourselves. We talk about wanting to get rid of it. The thing is, it's not going anywhere. Anger is here to stay, no matter how happy you are, no matter how much you are in sync with the universe, no matter how much enlightenment has touched you. You are going to get angry. And thank goodness for that. Because anger can point the way. It can spring us to action; many forces of change are motivated by anger. If it were the only motivation, we'd be like 2-year-olds, but combine anger with a conscience and a sense of justice and you have the makings of a social movement.

JUSTIN LIOI, "The Misunderstood Emotion: Getting to Know Your Anger", Good Therapy, March 9, 2016

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Holding anger is poison. It eats u from inside. We might think that hating is a weapon that attacks the person who harmed us. But no, hatred is a Curved Blade. And the harm we do, we do to ourselves!

NADIA BUARI, "Holding on to anger is poisonous", Ghana Web, March 11, 2016

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All anger is actually a vulnerable emotion in disguise. If someone insults you, underneath your anger is pain. If your teen walks in three hours past curfew, underneath your anger is fear and worry. If someone publicly chastens you, underneath your anger is embarrassment. These vulnerable emotions are what you need to communicate, not the anger.

JONATHAN DECKER, "Your Family Expert: Managing anger to connect more and fight less", The Independent, March 1, 2016

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Comprehending the attractiveness of anger is an essential element for its healing. There is something absolutely delicious about finding fault with others and making one's own insecurities the justification for demonizing others. But rather than simply condemning anger or allowing it free rein, we can approach it with gentle inquiry. What values are being threatened? What beliefs are being jeopardized? What control is being wrested from our grasp? And conversely, how good does it feel judging others, punishing them, and relishing in revenge? If anger is delicious, we should be willing to recognize how much we take delight in threatening, haranguing, and demeaning those from whom we feel separate.

ALAN BRISKIN, "How Demagogues Turn Anger Into Collective Poison: The Middle-Finger Party", Huffington Post, March 2, 2016

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The common theme in anger is that you don't know how to solve a problem.

AARON KARMIN, "Who Taught You to Manage Anger?", PsychCentral, March 3, 2016

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When anger plays a dominant role in family traditions, it becomes a norm which follows a man into maturity, relationships and marriage. The effect of anger in families is usually visible in the way he relates to others, especially his spouse.

ELIZABETH BADEJO, "You can help your spouse overcome his anger", Punch, March 5, 2016

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I have been deeply troubled in these last months by many, perhaps most, of the presidential candidates on both sides. It's not their policies so much (well, actually, I'm also troubled by many of them), but rather the fact that anger has become their one shared, passionate position. Democrats and Republicans, moderates and extremists, almost all have preached anger. Be angry! Fan the flames of that anger! The non-stop focus on anger frankly scares me. Politicians who act and rule and evaluate and decide from a position of anger are liable to regret it all after the fact, but unlike my individual, private behavior fueled by anger, which may backfire on me and a few of those closest to me, the angry behavior of our nation's leaders may well backfire, in disastrous ways on all of us.

DAVID NELSON, "Anger Is Not The Noblest Of Sentiments", Shawangunk Journal, March 23, 2016

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Anger can sometimes just be the loudest thing in the room. If there are other issues going on (spoiler alert: there are almost always other issues going on), these can be conveniently drowned out by the destructiveness and imperativeness of the anger. I say "conveniently" because anger is often the easiest emotion to notice and to deal with. It's also perhaps the scariest.

JUSTIN LIOI, "The Misunderstood Emotion: Getting to Know Your Anger", Good Therapy, March 9, 2016

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Imagine a pill you could take that instantly calms your temper when it's about to burst into a Herculean mess. That's what researchers might be on the brink of formulating after experiments helped them to identify the brain's anger centre. Scientists at New York University found that chemical changes in the brain's lateral septum made the mice attack other animals. It's a discovery that could lead to a calming drug. Meanwhile, the number of quiet seethers is growing. Research by PruHealth in the United Kingdom found that nearly half of us admit to snapping at colleagues, 28 per cent to shouting at people at work and one in four to slamming down phones and banging fists on desks. On social media, it takes very little to enrage the digital public into attack mode. But until the anger pill is a reality, our only option is self-management.

ISABEL CLARKE, "Ready to explode? Follow these five tips to curb your anger", Stuff, March 9, 2016

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We've gotten better at acting like anger doesn't exist, but it clearly still does. Letting it out, every now and then, actually is a healthy thing. May it never go too far, one way or the other. Don't hold it all the way in and don't let it all the way out, but a little toot of anger, every now and then, is a nice thing.

JASON SUDEIKIS, "Jason Sudeikis: 'A Toot Of Anger Is A Good Thing'", Contact Music, February 29, 2016

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Anger is a valuable emotion, even though we tend to see it as a problem. We think of anger as destructive. But anger is actually instructive. What deems it destructive or instructive is what we do with our anger. In other words, it depends on the actions we take. When we express our needs calmly and without judgement, we show respect to others and to ourselves -- and maybe we even get our needs met.

MARGARITA TARTAKOVSKY, "How to Express Your Anger Effectively", PsychCentral, February 26, 2016

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In Buddhist thought, anger is one of three poisons, the others being greed and ignorance. Together, they create a trance state overtaking the mind, causing delusion and suffering. The delusion is of a particular kind, believing we are separate from other living things and the physical earth that is our home.

ALAN BRISKIN, "How Demagogues Turn Anger Into Collective Poison: The Middle-Finger Party", Huffington Post, March 2, 2016

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