ANGER QUOTES VII

quotations about anger

Zero? Meet 60. That seems the rate at which we accelerate these days from being irked to outraged. The server was late with your salad, your boss breezed right by you, coach pulled your daughter in the third quarter, the grocery ran out of rotisserie chicken -- it doesn't take much to make people erupt. We used to get over it, maybe kvetch to our spouse, then move on. Now, though, there's a compulsion -- some call it an opportunity -- to share our outrage on Facebook, on Twitter, on Yelp, from behind the wheel or by unloading on a clerk. What's going on?

KIM ODE, "Ticked off on Twitter, yowling on Yelp: As a culture, why are we so darn mad?", Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 11, 2016

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If you don't know what to do when angry, you like most people, have an unfortunate tendency to make up your own interventions. This DIY approach to managing anger is counter-productive and ineffective. It only prolongs the pain and magnifies its destructive consequences. You are pouring salt in your wound.

JUSTIN LIOI, "The Misunderstood Emotion: Getting to Know Your Anger", Good Therapy, March 9, 2016

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One of the biggest myths about anger is that it cannot be changed or treated. Research studies indicate that the way one expresses anger is not an inherited trait, but a learned behavior. Therefore, one can learn more effective and appropriate ways to express it. Every year, thousands of people self-injure, cause millions of dollars of property damage and even murder others out of anger. A disagreement at a family picnic resulted in a stabbing because one person did not like the food. A road rage incident turned deadly because both parties were in a heightened emotional state. A man was killed because he saw his wife's former boyfriend talking to her. If anger is unchecked, it can turn into a deadly force.

NANCY RYBURN, "Angry outbursts learned behavior, not inherited trait", The Pine Bluff Commercial, March 11, 2016

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My anger bingo card is full. Something will turn. It's peaks and valleys. When wanting to access anger, it does help, going through these sessions. Five hours at a time of pretending to be an action hero, or yelling and screaming, does exercise or exorcise those demons, as does a really long, late, drunken night of karaoke.

JASON SUDEIKIS, "Jason Sudeikis: 'A Toot Of Anger Is A Good Thing'", Contact Music, February 29, 2016

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What we know about anger is that it inflates self-importance and builds a wall between genuine introspection and finding right action. Anger can be a useful signal, alerting us that something is amiss, but if we don't explore what truly makes us angry, anger isolates us from our heart's intelligence and our connection with others. Anger may be thrilling, but it also leaves us separate and alone.

ALAN BRISKIN, "How Demagogues Turn Anger Into Collective Poison: The Middle-Finger Party", Huffington Post, March 2, 2016

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Anger manifests itself in different ways. One person might turn their anger against themselves, which can manifest as depression, addiction or self-harm. Another might explode. But anger has a necessary function: to protect, by alerting us to threat and giving us the courage to meet challenges. That "threat system" is part of our evolution -- it's primal -- and changes your body from a calm state into one that is ready to attack or run away. A shot of the stress hormone adrenaline is released, which leads to tense muscles, increased blood circulation, short breathing and alertness. People who are under chronic stress exist in a constant state of attack mode.

ISABEL CLARKE, "Ready to explode? Follow these five tips to curb your anger", Stuff, March 9, 2016

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When we're angry, we yell, criticize, judge, shut down, give the silent treatment, isolate or say, "I'm fine!" (without of course being fine). These actions end up hurting both the other person and us. They feel bad, and we might feel worse. We might regret the insults and judgments we hurled their way. We might feel frustrated that we didn't articulate the real reason behind our anger. We might feel frustrated that we weren't heard.

MARGARITA TARTAKOVSKY, "How to Express Your Anger Effectively", PsychCentral, February 26, 2016

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Anger can be intoxicating. Think of a time you replayed an incident over and over in your mind. Perhaps something happened during your morning commute. You texted your girlfriend about it, called your mom, emailed your friend, and talked about it over lunch, yet you're still thinking about it as you try to go to sleep. You're not letting it go. You're practicing it. You're just getting better at being angry. It's not propelling you to change a social ill. It's not allowing you to move on by expressing it. It is keeping you stuck, perhaps nursing your own self-righteousness. You are suddenly at the mercy of a powerful and misunderstood emotion--one that gains more energy the more wood you throw on its fire.

JUSTIN LIOI, "The Misunderstood Emotion: Getting to Know Your Anger", Good Therapy, March 9, 2016

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